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Oyster & Porter House

Oysters and beer? Some might find it rebellious and disrespectful, but it's not even a new idea. The tradition of pairing dark beer and oysters comes from 18th century, when oysters were a cheap and popular snack in taverns, mainly eaten by the working class. In the early 20th century, most of oyster beds were destroyed. The scarsity increased prices and oysters became an expensive delicacy, served with a glass of champagne instead of a pint of beer.

London’s Oyster & Porter House serves both oysters and beer. It is situated right next to the Borough Market, so the culinary competition is enormous. It’s a proper oyster bar, with a selection from France and Ireland, as well as Spain, Japan and New Orleans. The food menu changes daily, depending on availability of fresh fish and seafood. You can try Cornish crab, shell-on Atlantic prawns or a delicious beef, Guinness and oyster pie. The traditionalists, who only pair oysters with bubbles, shouldn't be disappointed - there's a wine and champagne list available.

I can now officially confirm that dark beer and oysters are a match made in heaven, especially if it’s an oyster stout we’re talking about. Some modern oyster stouts are simply beers that go well with oysters, but some breweries remain faithful to the tradition and actually add a handful of oysters to the barrel.

A half dozen of oysters and a glass of stout always make a perfect lunch.

Oyster & Porter House, The Wright Brothers

11 Stoney Street, Borough Market

London

Clams steamed with cider

A steamy pot of mussels or clams is a rather effective, yet extremely simple and easy dish. It takes so little time to prepare it that it almost seems unfair. Anyway, if you're looking for a spectacular main for a date, a family dinner or a larger party, go for shellfish. They're great with white wine, but beer and cider make delicious alternatives.

Recipe: Clams steamed with cider

Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 1 kg of clams, cleaned
  • 2 shallots, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • one tbsp. of butter
  • 300 ml of dry cider
  • 2 tbsp. of freshly chopped parsley
Method
  • Melt butter in a large pot.
  • Add garlic and shallots and cook until tender.
  • Add clams and wine, increase the heat and cover the pot.
  • Cook for about 5 minutes, until shells has opened.
  • Top with fresh parsley. Serve with fresh baguette and a glass of chilled cider.

Bloody Mary

Bloody Mary seems to be a good friend of everyone who ever had to deal with the morning-after syndrome. Potassium and vitamin C (and vodka) make it a perfect choice for brunch, especially when Mimosa is just not enough.

There are at a few conflicting claims of who invented the Bloody Mary (and even if most of these bartenders are lying, it's hard to blame them). The cocktail was probably created in the first half of the 20th century. Its name comes from sorbiquet given to Queen Mary I of England, known for gory executions of Protestants when she tried to turn England back to Roman Catholicism.

The simplest recipe includes vodka and tomato juice, the most classic mix adds lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, tabasco, salt and pepper. There are numerous variations. Bloody Fairy contains absinth instead of vodka, Bloody Maria replaces vodka with tequila, Bloody Moly - with Irish whiskey. The inventors of Bloody Bull combined beef bouillon with tomato juice, the admirers of Bloody Mariyaki substitute Worcestershire sauce with teriyaki. Bloodless Mary comes without tomato juice, Bloody Shame is a sad cocktail without vodka.

The most common garnish is a celery stalk, sometimes coming with olives, pickles and lemon slices. More elaborate ones include jalapeño peppers, becon, cheese, oysters or shrimp. The most extraordinary Bloody Marys are garnished with mini burgers (as well as full-size burgers), pizza slices (as well as entire pizzas) and hot dogs.

Recipe: Bloody Mary

Serves: 2 adults
Ingredients
  • 160 ml of vodka
  • 320 ml of tomato juice
  • juice of one lemon
  • 5-6 dashes of tabasco
  • a dash of salt
  • a dash of pepper
Method
  • Combine all the ingredients in cocktail shaker with a few cubes of ice.
  • Strain into chilled cocktail glasses.
  • Add garnish.

Recipe: Garnish

Ingredients
  • celery stalks
  • caper berries
  • dried chili peppers
  • lemon slices
  • prosciutto wrapped shrimp, grilled or roasted

fregola sarda with mussels and clams

Although it’s not a confirmed fact, the term sardine may actually come from the island of Sardinia, around which sardines were once abundant. Despite its obvious connections with fish and water, Sardinian cuisine is mostly based on meat. Naturally, you can enjoy a pot of fresh mussels and clams or a platter of langoustines and squids in a seaside trattoria. What is more, one of the local specialities, called bottarga, is a delicacy of salted, cured fish roe, served similarly to grated parmesan to add flavour to simple pasta dishes. The most renowned Sardinian dish is, however, porceddu - roasted whole suckling piglet, grilled on a fire built with aromatic woods, seasoned with myrtle, which is one of the most remarkable aromas of the island. Due to numerous invasions that the island had suffered from (starting as early as with the Carthaginians in the 6th century BC), Sardinians were forced to move their settlements towards the centre of the island, which meant walking away from the richness of seafood.

Sardinian cuisine was strongly influence by the pastoralism, which’s story is as old as the story of Sardinia itself. Most of the island’s territories are grazings, unsuitable for any other agricultural production. This is why herding (mostly sheep, but also goats and cattle) had to become one of the most common occupation for the islanders. Shepherds needed food that was simple, nutritious and easy to transport, like maturing meats and cheeses, which get more flavourful with age and special types of bread. Thin and crispy carasau can be stored in a dry place for up to a year. Another light flatbread, pistoccu, can be eaten dry or softened with water. Then there’s civraxiu, crispy on the outside, soft and chewy inside. Owing to the preparation method and combination of ingredients, it can stay soft for a long time.

A careful culinary observer will easily spot traces of foreign cultures. The most evident ones come from Spain, as Sardinia was under Spanish control for a several centuries. One will find the very same whole roasted piglet in Castilian cookbooks, under the name cochinillo asado. Another example is favata (in Italian) or fabata (in Spanish) - a hearty stew made in the winter with dried fava beans and pork. Arabic influences are visible when it comes to spices (saffron is now grown on the island and used to season soups and stews), roasted lamb, chickpeas and eggplants.

Another example of Arabic legacy is fregola - little balls of pasta made with semolina. It’s particularly popular in the southwestern part of the island, where it was probably brought by Ligurian merchants from today’s Tunisia. Fregola is closely related to Maghreb’s couscous, it is even called Sardinian couscous. In fact it resembles pitim, the Israelian take on couscous, more. The balls are bigger that the regular couscous and toasted after drying, which gives them unique golden colour and characteristic taste.

Fregola is served with fish soups and meat broths or with sauce. It is traditionally paired up with clams and tomato sauce (fregola alle arselle) or with hard sheep’s milk cheese, pecorino sardo (fregola incasada; incasado is a Sardinian term for ‘seasoned with cheese’, Sardinian pecorino in most of the cases). The recipe below is a modified version of the classic, fregola with clams and mussels.

Recipe: Fregola sarda with mussels and clams

Ingredients
  • 1/2 kg of mussels
  • 1/2 kg of clams
  • 1 1/2 cup of dry fregola sarda
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • one large onion, diced
  • 2 cups of scalded, peeled and diced tomatoes
  • 1 1/2 cup of dry white wine
  • one tbsp. of brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp. of olive oil
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Method
  • Heat olive oil in a large skillet. Add garlic and onion and cook until golden brown.
  • Add tometoes, season with sugar, salt and pepper. Cook over low heat for about 20 minutes, until sauce begins to thicken.
  • Add one cup of wine, increase the heat, bring to boil, add fregola and cook for 4 minutes.
  • Add remaining wine, bring to boil. Add mussels and clams, cover the skillet and cook over high heat until they open.
  • Serve with bread.

green curry mussels

Recipe: Green curry paste

Ingredients
  • 5 medium green chilis, roughly chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 shallots, roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp. of freshly grated ginger
  • a bunch of fresh cilantro
  • 2 lemongrass stalks, chopped
  • juice and zest of 2 limes
  • 1 tbsp. of coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp. of ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. of black peppercorns
  • 2 tsp. of soy sauce
Method
  • Place all of the ingredients in a food processor and blitz to a paste.

Recipe: Green curry mussels

Ingredients
  • 1 kg of fresh mussels, washed and cleaned
  • 1 1/2 cup of coconut milk
  • 3 tbsp. of brown sugar
  • one lime
  • 1/2 bunch of fresh cilantro
  • 2 tbsp. of vegetable oil
  • one green chili
Method
  • Heat oil in a large sauce pan. Add green curry paste and cook, stirring, until fragrant (3-4 minutes).
  • Add coconut milk and sugar and bring to boil.
  • Add mussels, cover the saucepan with a lid and cook until mussels open.
  • Top with lime juice, fresh cilantro and slices of green chili. Serve immediately.
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